The Internet will soon be quite different, as downloaders of illegal software, movies and songs will be seen as criminals and will be cracked down as criminals are under TPP.

You might be wondering how come this will happen? Well, the WikiLeaks documents dump from Trans-Pacific Partnership trade calls for internet service providers to provide IDs of all the users who are involved in downloading of anything that is deemed illegal to download.

The documents dumped were analyzed by ZDnet who identified the documents asking for identities of any person downloading illegal stuff. Though, this is only limited to the nations who are part of the TPP.

What that means is that all the ISPs that come within the agreement will have to track all the data downloaded and report if they find any suspicious data being downloaded.

ZDnet also reflected on one more important point that they found in the documents.

They found a big difference in the earlier versions of the agreement and the new one, in the earlier ones the cost of tracking down the users was on the actual owners of the materials.

But, in the new version all the costs have been shifted to the ISPs, the document states that:

“Expeditiously remove or disable access to material residing on their networks or systems upon obtaining actual knowledge of the infringement.”

This clearly reflects on how both the ISPs and the users in upcoming would be under the pump.

Though, this agreement is not finalized yet, but according to WikiLeaks the latest version leaked to the public is final and would be agreed on soon.

What is The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)?

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a proposed trade agreement between twelve Pacific Rim countries concerning a variety of matters of economic policy.

However, it is under massive criticism since the beginning, even by the online hacktivists Anonymous who hacked U.S. Census Bureau in July 2015 and leaked a trove of confidential data against the TTIP/TPP.